Posts Tagged ‘Happy Mondays’

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Heavy Rotation 49

June 20, 2010

For your reading pleasure this week (all links open in a new window – all mp3s can be downloaded by right-clicking on the song title):

A Kalvacade of Kinkade news! Drunk driving, lawsuits, character assasinations… it’s all here!

http://blogs.sacbee.com/crime/archives/2010/06/painter-thomas.html 
(check out the comment section for more fun…)

http://www.thebaffler.com/viewArticle/122
(On the “Placerville” biopic – specifically how fake it is. Plus, why do Kinkade’s houses always look like they’re burning down from the inside?)

http://www.vanityfair.com/online/daily/2008/11/thomas-kincades-16-guidelines-for-making-stuff-suck.html
(How Thomas Kinkade imagines he creates art. Step by tedious cliched step.)

Earlier versions, now 90% Kinkade-free!:
The Heavy Rotation Archives

Incubator – Cigarettes.mp3
If you were here for last week’s Heavy Rotation, we led off with a Jesus and Mary Chain-styled piece of fuzzy bliss by Rraaiillss, a.ka. Adam Anderson. Well, as it turns out, not only is he extraordinarily talented but he’s a hell of a nice guy as well, as I received an email from him thanking me for featuring his music.

After emailing back and forth a bit, he pointed me in the direction of another of his projects, Incubator. Say goodbye to the waves of carefully crafted feedback and say hello to something that sold its guitars to buy keyboards.

Feast your ears on this: a gorgeous slice of synth-y loveliness called Cigarettes, which conjures up all the best parts of Joy Division/early New Order filtered through the best stuff m83 and Ulrich Schnauss have to offer. Completely catches the feeling of that catch in your heart when you wake up next to someone you fully expected to be gone, especially the way that burst of unfiltered emotional sunlight revives a flagging psyche.

Foster the People – Pumped Up Kicks.mp3
Now that your heart is racing unsteadily, let’s jump into a slice of bouncy heaven, albeit one that makes you laugh inappropriately. Foster the People would (very charmingly) like to inform you that they plan on killing you for your kick-ass (and very expensive) trainers.

As the chorus swells, you’ll be forced to sing along, alarming unsuspecting passersby with your murderous intentions and blithesome (thx Ulysses) harmonizing:

All the other kids with their pumped up kicks
Better run better run
Outrun my gun

And then, no fucking shit, they start whistling. It’s altogether too much. You can try and fight it but they’re still going to charm the shoes right off your bullet-riddled corpse. (Show of hands: who else felt the urge to do the Swim by eight beats in or so? Be honest.)

Parties in Belgrade – Statues.mp3
Still sticking with bouncy, it’s Parties in Belgrade, a band that usually runs a little darker, but in this instance channel all the feelgood parts of the Happy Mondays, with lead singer Carlos Anthony sounding more like Shaun Ryder than Ryder does these days.

And away they go, rambling on about erecting facetious pedestals, using words more for their flow than for deeper meaning. The slightly-tuffer-than-Happy guitars start duelling, one conjuring Hawaii and the other Pere Ubu.

Have no idea what the fook I’m on about?*

*[See next track for exactly what the fook I’m on about.]

Happy Mondays – Tokoloshe Man.mp3
A prime cut from the heyday of these baggy Madchester dance-rock merchants. One of two songs stolen from John Kongos (the other is Step On). When they could be troubled to put the smack down long enough to record, they cranked out some of the best twisted pop out there. Lead singer Shaun Ryder would then stamp his unmistakable vocals on the track, freely associating, swearing and stealing bits of others’ songs, turning each Monday’s song into a catchy, shambling wreck that charmed you with its rough-edged cheerfulness even as it shook you down for drug money.

This song is an undeniably pleasant way of dealing with a creature from the collective nightmares of South Africa, a hairy beast that is part “zombie, poltergeist and gremlin,” capable of crossing cultural boundaries just to kill:

It makes no difference if you are yellow or you’re red
When the bad man says
Tonight is the night when you are dead

Plus, it has some well-deployed organ.

Twisted Wires – Oh Hell.mp3
To wrap things up, we’re going dark with the perfect track to send you out into the word, all covered in sunglasses and feisty antagonism. Friends of Adam Anderson/Rraaiillss/Incubator, Twisted Wires conjures up ghosts both chronic and recent* including Sex Gang Children, the Swans, Chrome, Fields of the Nephilim, Holy Fuck, Bauhaus and maybe even a little Coil.

*[Name that reference!]

Dark dark dark. Minor chords pinned down by bass-heavy drones and near-tribal drumming. The perfect antidote to all the smiling faces currently exiting/entering various places of worship.

[Need a track taken down? Care to point out my numerous spelling errors and faulty references? Just need me to wire “some amount” of USD to a Nigerian FedEx? Contact me at: 2timegrime@gmail.com.]

-CLT

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Fancy Plans Guide to Rock and Roll Vol. 10 – All F-ed Up Edition

September 22, 2009

Volume 10. Has it been 10 already?

Time for an anthology. If any of you have time in your lives for approximately 12,000 words containing approximately 0 facts, please let me know. I can send you the appropriate links via horseless carriage. My manservant Riley will be pleased to dictate these to you in his unplaceable Continental accent.

Tip well. Riley has a hot temper and a driver’s license. When he says he’s about to “lay a bitch out,” you can rest assured he means it.

Without further ado, whatnot and misc. bullshit, here it ’tis: Volume 10 – All F’ed-Up Edition.

 

Faith No More: they clean up real nice...

Faith No More: they clean up real nice...

 

Faith No More
Charged by absolutely no one to draw up the funk-metal blueprint, Faith No More charged onto the scene in 1985 with the heavily rotated single We Care a Lot. After priming the pump with a track that name-checked Transformers, Garbage Pail Kids and the police departments of various major U.S. cities, a band usually has only one way to go.

Not so with Faith No More. Following a long-running rock tradition of replacing lead singers, FNM shattered expectations (and a few hotel TV sets) by getting rid of the shitty vocalists first (Chuck Mosely, Courtney Love) and bringing in the stud (Mike Patton).

Expectations duly shattered (and repair bills passed on to label execs), the new Faith No More hit the ground rapping with their huge single, Epic. The accompanying video’s live fish execution scene shook up a stagnant metal scene in ways no one could have predicted. Suddenly everyone wanted more funk in their metal, rap in their lyrics, peanut butter in their chocolate and keyboard players in their band.

Stagnant metal scene duly shook up, Mike Patton gazed upon this wreckage (that’s a Numan reference) with a mixture of contempt and bemusement. Rather than crank out Epic v.2, the band delivered Angel Dust, a roaring disfigurement of an album which left their label heads shaking their collective heads in contempt and, presumably, musement. Or bewilderment.

The band reached their peak with a nearly note-for-note cover of the Commodores’ Easy. With their metalhead crowd left to puzzle out this inscrutable move (and scurry for their dictionaries), Mike Patton served notice that he was no ordinary lead singer, perfectly comfortable with shredding your eardrums and his vocal cords or laying you down by the fire to make sweet, sweet love at you. (And I stole that one from Zap Brannigan. But as the old saying goes, “If you have to steal, make sure you tell everybody about it.”)

At this point, the Faith No More story becomes vague, another in the multi-volume set (from the Time/Life Series Diminishing Returns). Patton split from the band to pursue side projects that ranged from “unlistenable” to “potentially brain damaging.” Keyboardist Roddy Bottum went on to form the incomparable Imperial Teen. The other guys went on to do “other guy” stuff, presumably.

Lionel Richie continued to crank out regrettable product. Like Nicole.

 

Welcome to the fifth dimension. (Not pictured: The Fifth Dimension.)

Welcome to the fifth dimension. (Not pictured: The Fifth Dimension.)

 

Fifth Dimension
A group that was always “a little bit soul; a little bit hippie bullshit,” the Fifth Dimension are best known for their pioneering work done in a dimension that was two past where most bands were willing to go.

Often performing their entire tour in the fifth dimension, the band would draw huge crowds despite there being hardly anything visible on stage. Die-hard fans would claim to see brief glimpses of the band members between bright flashes of light and faint snatches of otherworldly voices. Those in the audience who were not psychotropically enhanced often claimed to have “not seen a damn thing” and that the whole “experience” was “bullshit.”

During one of their brief forays into a third dimension studio, the Fifths recorded their massive hit “Age of Aquarius,” which soundtracked a key nude scene in naked-hippie musical Hair. Hair’s producers wisely reasoned that a fair amount of nudity would be a box office draw, but theater-goers found the nudity was far less than gratuitous. In fact, because this was the Sixties and the performers were hippies, the advertised “sexy bits” were left to the imagination due to the incredible amount of hair. Said one theater-goer: “Dear God. It’s everywhere! And the smell…”

The Fifth Dimension faded into obscurity as fans flocked to bands more readily visible on stage and less likely to spin watches backwards or leave the audience members covered in ectoplasm and artifacts.

There was also the matter of the class action lawsuit filed against the band by the city of Pomona, CA. The suit alleged that the Fifth Dimension were “dicking around with forces they can’t possibly comprehend,” thus cataclysmically opening “a gateway to hell.” The court found in favor of the city as the Fifth Dimension were either unable or unwilling to attend in any sort of visible fashion. The members were ordered to pay for any damages incurred by Satan’s minions and to “cease and desist from making music and fade into obscurity.”

 

mark-e-smith

The Fall's Mark E. Smith - His voice sounds every bit as good as he looks.

 

The Fall
Anybody who knows me knows I have a weakness for Manchester natives who can’t sing for shit (hello, Happy Mondays). Mark E. Smith, he of the inimitable Mancunian drawl, has combined with various iterations of his band to produce over 1,200 albums. This includes nearly 4,500 singles, 300 live albums and 150 or so one-offs, released on anything from 45’s, cassette-only and wax cylinders. If you are new to the band, you can’t go wrong starting out with any of over 200 greatest-hits compilations.

As you make your way through the treacherous back catalog that rivals the legendary vaults of Prince or the drunken productivity of Guided by Voices, there is also the shifting band dynamic to consider. Various styles and influences will crop up as the band continually experiments with their sound.

A lot of the shift also comes from Mark E. Smith’s on-again, off-again relationship with his sometimes wife and guitarist, Brix Smith. This can also be said about his relationship with the rest of the band, although probably with a lot less sexual contact. Hence, a lot of comparison just within the Brix and non-Brix albums.

Which brings us to the pinnacle of their career: a cover of disco favorite Lost in Music by Sister Sledge, proving yet again (see above) that great bands are at their best when they cover classic pop without irony.

Of course, much like above (see also: Faith No More), this set a precedent that was followed by shitty bands whose careers never really had a pinnacle (Limp Bizkit – Behind Blue Eyes [the Who]; Alien Ant Farm – Smooth Criminal[Michael Jackson]; the Ataris – Boys of Summer [Don Fucking Henley])

One final note: Mark E. Smith’s singing can be an acquired taste and should actually be prefaced with quote/enquote. It’s not so much singing as it is a rambling drawl with extra ending syllables. But before you start talking shit about lack of vocal talent, ask yourself this: who would you rather listen to for an extended period of time: Bob Dylan or Celine Dion?

The prosecution rests.

 

It was the early '80s. Mirrors and restraint hadn't been invented yet. Or color, apparently.

It was the early '80s. Mirrors and restraint hadn't been invented yet. Or color, apparently.

 

A Flock of Seagulls
The quintessential ’80s band, A Flock of Seagulls were truly a snapshot of their place and time, so tied to the brief “new” wave of music that they spent several weeks in the Top 40 Wishing (They Had Taken A Better Photograph). Epitomized by their stupid hairdos and overuse of parentheses, AFoS were charter members of the Haircut 100, a group of New Romantic groups whose cross-country runs were immortalized in AFoS’ greatest hit, I Ran (a 10K for Charity).

As music progressed, bringing with it hair metal and ridiculous hairdos of a different kind, AFoS remained in a creative holding pattern, doomed (as with so many other bands) to fade into obscurity, only to be harshly marginalized by smartass “blogger personalities” such as myself.

Godspeed, Seagulls. And take these fucking things with you: ( )

-CLT

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Heavy Rotation Vol. 9

August 2, 2009

Easy. Easy like Sunday morning.

Oh, good morning, kids. I was just about to changes shoes and sweaters for no apparent reason. It’s a nice day out. A nice day to head down to the railroad tracks and heckle the king.

It may be quite a walk today. My neighborhood is in mid-gentrification and they’re pushing out pensioners like myself along with the ne’er-do-wells to far out suburbs. I’m not bitter. It just means I have to walk a little further. And dodge a few more bullets.

On the way, we’ll collect my monthly check if the neighborhood roughnecks haven’t already turned it into malt liquor. Let’s take some travelling music along, shall we? That’s right. A little song or two to put a bounce in our step and a sock full of nickels in our hip pocket…

[Previous versions available here: Heavy Rotation Archives]

HappyMondays-01-wide

Happy Mondays – Cuntry Disco
After 15 long and presumably sober years, the Happy Mondays are fookin’ back. And they’ve brought their questionable sense of humor with them. That is not a typo. Great track about doing a variety of things outside someone’s bedroom window, with a little steel guitar thrown in for cuntry fans. A little something for Ramblin’ Rooster as well, with some bookending “Cock-a-doodle-doo’s” belted out in Ryder’s inimitable Mancunian drawl.

 

Trans_am_-_Futureworld-1999

Trans Am – Televison Eyes
The space rock side of this trio comes to the fore in this track, which features some nicely robotic vocals and some synth work that seems to incorporate a little melody from Telstar. Not to repeat myself, but a dangerously underrated band, whose body of work is truly a pleasure to experience.

 

ZeroLeCrecheFallingSideA

Zero Le Creche – Last Year’s Wife
I got ahold of this goth track on an extremely shitty goth comp that was issued by the mysterious ZZZ Records. Apparently a pretty tough band to track down, what with only one release. Not so much goth like dark, but actually more along the lines of early New Order and Echo & the Bunnymen. Melancholy at its finest.

 

justice-live-754609

Justice – Planisphere Pt. I (MMMatthias Mix)
Now, we will head to the club. I have, to this point, mainly spared you from my repetitive beats fascination. Consider yourselves unspared. German producer MMMatthias takes the already bombastic beats and synths of French House producers Justice and trims away anything vaguely resembling restraint. Clocking in at a little more that 4 minutes, it’s a tad short for club play, but the intensity probably wouldn’t stand up to further stretching.

 

rekids002

Rekid – Next Stop Chicago
Radio Slave’s alter alter ego (Matt Edwards to his mum) kicks out a damn near minimal track, only without all that minimal bullshit. While I seem to be verging on oxymoron here, let me explain. Rather than clicky nothingness, the synthwork and vocal samples lend it a dark propulsion that wouldn’t feel out of place in a bassbin or in a long drive through the dark.

All mp3s in one lumbering zip file (link opens in new window):
Heavy Rotation Vol. 9

-CLT

[All music posted on Fancy Plans… is kick ass and too awesome to be contained. All music is also posted temporarily and, due to it’s high level of ass-kicking, should not be distributed without a prescription and care should be taken while operating heavy equipment or dancing around the living room (clothing optional, but do remember that the blinds are open/kids are still awake).
Should you wish to have your brilliant artistic statement forced back into confinement, please email me at 2timegrime@gmail.com. Feel free to leave a comment, as that will probably be noticed sooner.
By all means, if you like what you hear (and you will), please support the totally rocking artist(s) by purchasing some music or heading out to see them live.]
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Fancy Plans… Guide to Rock and Roll (More Requests and Random Victims)

June 4, 2009

Much like previous installments (first, second and third), almost all information should be taken with several pillars of salt. Prepare to be blasphemed and sodomized by everything you never knew you didn’t know about the world of rock.

Einsturzende Neubauten band members loved to create their own instruments; ignore manufacturer's warnings

Einsturzende Neubauten band members loved to create their own instruments; ignore manufacturer's warnings

Einsturzende Neubauten
Ever since the first children climbed out the primordial ooze, opened the lower cupboards and proceeded to beat the hell out of pots and pans, man has been searching for a way to express this musically.

Einsturzende Neubauten, formed in 1980, fulfilled this dream. Early concerts featured band members flailing away at any percussive item, including fellow band members, the audience and lederhosen-clad beer wenches. Their name, which is often misspelled (often within this post itself) means “collapsing new buildings.” In a delightful play on words (and another display of German whimsy), the emphasis can be shifted to the third syllable of the first word to form a completely different phrase: “prolapsing new rectums.”

Guitarist, vocalist and pinup Blixa Bardot, has branched out from her noisy roots to play and tour with Nick Cave as “Under-Utilized Guitarist #1.” Her distinctive sound can barely be heard during interminable live renditions of such dark classics as Stagger Lee and Piano Man.

Einsturenzo Teubauten’s has influenced a number of industrial and noise groups including KMFDM’s early days as vacuum demonstrators, the Blue Man Group and their improvised instruments, Test Department’s general political cacophony, Rammstein’s general Germanness and the first 30 seconds of Def Leppard’s Rock of Ages.

Psst. Would you have the latest Sex Gang Children behind the counter?

Psst. Would you have the latest Sex Gang Children behind the counter?

Sex Gang Children
The only band in history to have been arrested for naming themselves, Andi Sex Gang and his Children have subsequently been cleared of all charges. Despite this, their name alone has caused more stage whispering in record stores than any other band on record (runners-up include Rapeman, the Negro Problem and Celine Dion). Each album release party tends to be swarmed by irate FBI drones and concerned politicians up for re-election. The band themselves have been asked not to perform within 1,500 yards of schools, playgrounds and public television stations.

The Catholic Church has of yet refused to take a solid stance on this band and their activities, so you may be able to catch a show in the unfortunately named rectory.

The Gang of Four's early years as a barbershop quartet

The Gang of Four's early years as a barbershop quartet

Gang of Four
The original seminal punk-funk band, to which the less politically-minded the Rapture owe their careers. Originally just a poorly organized student protest, the Gang of Four coalesced their displeasure with pretty much fucking everything into a funky, left-wing monster. Tackling everything from the military (I Love a Man in a Uniform) to capitalism (It Fails Us Now), poverty (To Hell With!) and assorted other hot-button topics (Anthrax).

Much like other seminal bands, they continued on to outlive their usefulness and reformed in 2004 to cash in on everyone who has missed their topical complaining the first time around. New waves of students were galvanized by their aging rhetoric and went about making posters and whatnot.

Rage Against the Machine could learn a thing or two from this band. Oh, they did. Mainly the reforming and touring. Because there’s money to be made. Evil, capitalistic money that spends the same as good, natural money. Actually better, because the first one exists while the other is simply the brainfart of many stoned students, whose lack of interest in making money has evolved into a bizarre hatred of those who will only exchange goods and services for money. Good luck with that.

Say, guv. The boys and I were wondering if you wouldn't have some fooking drugs?

Say, guv. The boys and I were wondering if you wouldn't have some fooking drugs?

Happy Mondays
Essentially a drug habit masquerading as a chart-topping band, the Happy Mondays formed in the “Angriest City in Britain,” Madchester, in 1980. Their effect of the burgeoning “baggy” scene was monumental.

While rewriting the blueprint for club music, the Mondays also has a tremendous effect on the slang of the day. Their code words for various items became ubiquitous. A few examples: “Kentucky Fried Chicken” – Heroin, “Junk” – Heroin, “Bez” – Psycho, “Case of the Mondays” – Suffering from heroin withdrawal.

While not producing club hits and referring to everyone and everything as “cunts,” Shaun Ryder and co. were hoovering up every available drug like Keith Richards understudies. Their unofficial slogan, “Taking Drugs to Make Music to Sell and, Subsequently, Purchase Drugs with the Profits” was shamelessly ripped off from contemporaries, the Spacemen 3. This set a precedent for “borrowing” that Ryder followed for the rest of the Mondays career and his solo work, taking solid chunks of Beatles’ lyrics, Pierre Henry’s Psyche Rock and, in the case of monster hit Step On, someone else’s entire song. (See also: David Lee Roth vs. Just a Gigolo.)

It all ended the way parent and politicians like to see a powerful drug story end: a disbanded group and a bankrupted label.

More exciting than this band

More exciting than this band

Bush
As children, someone asked them to “keep it down to a dull roar.” Bush ran with it, producing some of the dullest roar imaginable, following the trail inadvertently blazed by the subpar Candlebox (“Shit! I dropped one!”)

As Bush became the poster boys for everything wrong with Lowered Expectation Brand rock radio, their name has become synonomous with all things mediocre or worse: Bush league; Bush, George; Bush pilot; Layo and Bush Wacka!; Bush, George Dubya; Bush Wick Bill; 70s’-era porn Bush.

This man does amazing things with staircases

This man does amazing things with staircases

KMFDM
The show pony of Chicago’s Wax Trax! label, KMFDM became the go-to band for motion picture soundtracks due to their Teutonic bombast and lead singer MC En Escher’s ability to perform in more than three dimensions.

Much has been made of their name, which fans have speculated stands for anything from “Kill Mother Fucking Depeche Mode” to “Kylie Minogue Fans Don’t Masturbate.” In reality, it is the somewhat butchered German phrase “Kein Mehrheit Für Die Mitleid,” which Google translates as “No Midland Waffle Tuesday Ennui.”

Pontiac announces their updated tranny

Pontiac announces their updated tranny

Trans Am
A fine, if somewhat boring American-made sports car. In an effort to cross-promote, G.M. executives signed three Washington, D.C. youngsters in 1990 to “get the name out there.” Unfortunately, the band’s blend of synthpop and garage rock, coupled with their nearly lyricless output, appealed to few and sold even less, proving once again that if there’s one thing American auto executives don’t know, it’s running American auto companies.

Alex Patterson of the Orb (left) performs for a lucky Make-A-Wish Foundation child

Alex Patterson of the Orb (left) performs for a lucky Make-A-Wish Foundation child

the Orb
Having become bored with chart success, dumping dead sheep and burning money, KLF founding member Jimmy Cauty formed the Orb in 1988 in a shameless attempt to court the under-hygienic and overly-broke Grateful Dead crowd. Instead of 12 minutes of guitar wankery during the “ultimate live version” of Space Truckin (Cleveland 1978), the Orb dished out a 32-minute single, Blue Room, a song which repeatedly asks the question, “Is this the best use of your time?”

Citing influences as “disparate” as Pink Floyd and Brian Eno, the Orb continued on to release several albums of audio wallpaper, under the assumption that they would be used for ravers to “come down” with while being revived by paramedics.

allmusic.com says, “If you only listen to one Orb song, that’s probably all you really have time for. I mean, you’ve got shit to do, right? Work, walk the dog and that rain gutter won’t fix itself.”

The Crystal Method refused to buy another sequencer and live shows often turned into full-fledged fistfights

The Crystal Method refused to buy another sequencer and live shows often turned into full-fledged fistfights

the Crystal Method
Named after Dennis Hopper’s acting school (“Finding Your Character’s Center Through Massive Drug Intake”), which followed in the footsteps of old acting buddy Jack Nicholson’s “All Blow, All the Time” theory, the Crystal Method released their debut album, Vegas, in 1997.

Released during the height of the “techno takeover” of America, Vegaswent on to become one of the biggest-selling electronic albums of all time. Despite some major label star power and MTV’s half-assed co-opting, techno has since returned to its accepted uses: scoring movie club scenes, bumper music for sports-talk radio, and the lazy ad exec’s go-to genre for making something sound “new” or “exciting.”

In America, techo remains the “soccer” of the music world, more popular everywhere else but here. Having peaked on their debut, the Crystal Method waited seven years before releasing an underwhelming followup (see also: the Stone Roses). They are set to release a new album in 2009 and I couldn’t care less.

Comes free in every dime bag (while supplies last)

Comes free in every dime bag (while supplies last)

Bob Marley
Jamaican reggae singer who, during his brief but prolific career, released thousands of posters, hats, shirts, Jamaican flags and black velvet paintings, all featuring his dreadlocked, pot-smoking self. In the middle of the massive outpouring of self-promotion, Marley found time to release one album, the inexplicably named Legend: Bob Marley’s Greatest Hits.

Co-opted by a generation of couch-surfers, Marley’s sole album occupies a slot in even the least-discerning pothead’s music collection, alongside such favorites as Phish, Widespread Panic, the Dave Matthews Band, the Grateful Dead and, of course, Janis Joplin’s Greatest Hits.

When not being used for seed-and-stem sorting, Marley’s powerful album is the cornerstone (and only member) of the stoner’s reggae collection. Unless you count UB40. (Ed. – You know we don’t.)

Easily lost in the hotboxed haze is Marley’s revolutionary work and tireless anti-racism work, as is detailed in his songs:

  • “Is This Love” – the power of love; weed
  • “No Woman, No Cry” – comforting loved ones; weed
  • “Could You Be Loved” – again with the love; weed
  • “Three Little Birds” – props to the Audubon Society; weed
  • “Buffalo Soldier” – Black soldiers in the Indian Wars of the mid-1800’s; weed
  • “Get Up, Stand Up” – standing up for one’s rights; weed
  • “Stir It Up” – 5:33 – picking fights; weed
  • “One Love/People Get Ready” – monogamy/preparedness; weed
  • “I Shot the Sheriff” – shooting law enforcement; weed
  • “Waiting in Vain” – covering the Clash; weed
  • “Redemption Song” – double-coupon days; weed
  • “Satisfy My Soul” – getting some satisfaction; weed
  • “Exodus” – Moses, bitches; weed
  • “Jamming” – giving whitey something to sing along to, badly; weed

-CLT

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Heavy Rotation

May 31, 2009

Heavy Rotation is back, and it’s about goddamn time. Am I right?

The selections this time are some old favorites. Not necessarily “old” old, but some of my own personal classics, if you will. But, confusingly, some of these tracks are actually “old.” Like late 1970’s – early 1980’s “old.”

Ah, well. Age is in the eye of the beholder, much like these presumed classics would be to your beholding ear. Now, while you diagram that sentence, here’s today/this week’s/this month’s selections:

magazine

Magazine – Permafrost.mp3

From Howard Devoto’s post-Buzzcocks band, Magazine. This is the last track on their synth-driven, semi-critically reviled album Secondhand Daylight. Slower-paced but edged with a misanthropic menace. The punchline is in the chorus, as Devoto tells you the real reason for all the previous meandering:

As the day stops dead
at the place where we’re lost
I will drug you and fuck you
on the permafrost

Like every early spring rave in the upper Midwest!

hmondays

Happy Mondays – Hallelujah.mp3

Shaun Ryder takes what ostensibly is a club pop hit and makes it unsafe for listeners of any age. Most of the lyrical content deals either directly or obliquely with Shaun’s favorite pastime: heroin. He reaches his moral nadir at this point, with this lazily ugly threat/invitation:

Hallelujah, hallelujah
I’m Shaun Willie Ryder
I’ll lie down beside ya
Fill ya full of junk

clinic2

Clinic – Distortions.mp3

Clinic is a band that really sounds like no one else. Lots of syncopated drumming, heavy organ usage, a lead singer who relies on meaningless syllables and archaic slang. This song sounds like nothing in their catalogue. There is an organ, but the pace is much more funereal and wouldn’t sound too much out of place in someone’s Leonard Cohen collection, at least musically. Lyrically, however, we’re going a little darker:

It saved me once too often
You’d never know how often
I’ve pictured you in coffins
My baby in a coffin
But I love it when you blink your eyes

Oh I, I want to know my body
I want this out, not in me
I want no other leakage
I want to know no secrets yet

mekons

the Mekons – Dancing in the Head.mp3

As one of the most prolific and longest-running punk bands, the Mekons have covered all sorts of ground in the last 30 years. This particular song deals with voodoo rituals and zombies, all narrated over a propulsive guitar and drum shuffle. The Mekons take the high road and avoid tripping over any reggae cliches.

Possession is called dancing in the head.

pil

P.I.L. – Flowers of Romance.mp3

John Lydon’s post-Sex Pistols project, which was at least twice and interesting and a million times as skillful. Ostensibly a kiss-off song to departed bassist Jah Wobble, it can, of course, be interpreted as a bitter sendoff to anyone’s ex. Featuring Lydon on vocals and violin and godawesomely powerful drumming of a pre-Ministry Martin Atkins.

This one’s for Alan.

Now it’s summer
I could be happy or in distress
Depending on the company
On the veranda
Talk of the future or reminisce
Behind the dialogue
We’re in a mess
Whatever I intended
I sent you flowers
You wanted chocolates instead

The flowers of romance
The flowers of romance

I’ve got binoculars
On top of Box Hill
I could be Nero
Fly the eagle
Start all over again
I can’t depend on these so-called friends
It’s a pity you need to defend
I’ll take the furniture
Start all over again

[All music posted on Fancy Plans… is kick ass and too awesome to be contained. All music is also posted temporarily and, due to it’s high level of ass-kicking, should not be distributed without a prescription and care should be taken while operating heavy equipment or dancing around the living room (clothing optional, but do remember that the blinds are open/kids are still awake).
Should you wish to have your brilliant artistic statement forced back into confinement, please email me at 2timegrime@gmail.com. Feel free to leave a comment, as that will probably be noticed sooner.
By all means, if you like what you hear (and you will), please support the totally rocking artist(s) by purchasing some music or heading out to see them live.]

-CLT